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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Rumination disorder


Other Names for this Disease
  • Rumination syndrome
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Overview

Rumination disorder is the backward flow of recently eaten food from the stomach to the mouth. The food is then re-chewed and swallowed or spat out. A non-purposeful contraction of stomach muscles is involved in rumination. It may be initially triggered by a viral illness, emotional distress, or physical injury. In many cases, no underlying trigger is identified. Behavioral therapy is the mainstay of treatment.[1][2]

 

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Last updated: 4/23/2015

References

  1. Kessing BF, Smout AJ, Bredenoord AJ. Current diagnosis and management of the rumination syndrome. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul; 48(6):478-83. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ 24921208. Accessed 4/23/2015.
  2. Mousa HM, Montgomery M, Alioto A. Adolescent rumination syndrome. Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 2014 Aug; 16(8):398. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25064317. Accessed 4/23/2015.
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Basic Information

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Selected Full-Text Journal Articles

Other Names for this Disease
  • Rumination syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.