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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Sezary syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Sézary lymphoma
  • Sézary syndrome
  • Sezary's lymphoma
Related Diseases
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Cause

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What causes Sezary syndrome?

Although a small percentage of cases of Sezary syndrome are associated with human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 and type 2, the underlying cause of most cases is currently unknown.[1] In people affected by the condition, the cancerous T-cells (also called Sezary cells) usually have one or more chromosomal abnormalities. These genetic changes are considered "somatic" because they are acquired during a person's lifetime, are not inherited and only affect the DNA of the cancerous cells. Although any chromosome can be affected, people with Sezary syndrome often have deletions of DNA from chromosomes 10 and 17 or duplications of DNA on chromosomes 8 and 17. However, it is unclear whether these alterations play a role in the development of the condition.[2]
Last updated: 7/30/2015

References
  1. Elise A Olsen, MD; Alain H Rook, MD. UpToDate. Clinical presentation, pathologic features, and diagnosis of Sézary syndrome. May 2013; Accessed 7/30/2015.
  2. Sézary syndrome. Genetics Home Reference. March 2013; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/sezary-syndrome.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Sézary lymphoma
  • Sézary syndrome
  • Sezary's lymphoma
Related Diseases
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.