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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • SGBS1
  • Simpson dysmorphia syndrome
  • Bulldog syndrome
  • Golabi-Rosen syndrome
  • Dysplasia gigantism syndrome, X-linked
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Treatment

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How might supraventricular tachycardia be treated?

In most people, supraventricular arrhythmias are not dangerous. Mild arrhythmias, such as isolated premature beats, may require no treatment. A few people, however, may have arrhythmias that become dangerous and require immediate, perhaps prolonged, treatment. Treatment for supraventricular tachycardia usually focuses on decreasing the heart rate and breaking up the electrical circuits made by the abnormal conducting pathways. It includes stopping the acute episode and preventing any new ones. One of the most important considerations in treating an acute episode of supraventricular tachycardia is how severely the heart function has been affected. If an individual has low blood pressure, chest pain, or a failing heart with tachycardia, the condition may be considered unstable. Such cases may cause serious danger and require immediate treatment. Health care providers typically devise treatment that meets the specific cause of an individual's supraventricular tachycardia.  Treatment options (when being treated by a health care provider) may include vagal maneuvers, carotid massage, medications, use of a pacemaker, or surgery.[1]

The materials provided are for informational or educational purposes only and are not intended as a substitute for professional medical care, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Individuals seeking treatment options for supraventricular tachycardia or another cardiac abnormality should speak with their health care provider or cardiologist for personalized, expert advice.
Last updated: 2/15/2011

References
  1. Supraventricular Tachycardia. eMedicineHealth. 2011; http://www.emedicinehealth.com/supraventricular_tachycardia/article_em.htm. Accessed 2/15/2011.


Management Guidelines

  • GeneReviews provides current, expert-authored, peer-reviewed, full-text articles describing the application of genetic testing to the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with specific inherited conditions.
Other Names for this Disease
  • SGBS1
  • Simpson dysmorphia syndrome
  • Bulldog syndrome
  • Golabi-Rosen syndrome
  • Dysplasia gigantism syndrome, X-linked
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.