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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Sturge-Weber syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • SWS
  • Sturge Weber syndrome
  • Encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis
  • Fourth phacomatosis
  • Meningeal capillary angiomatosis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

Newline Maker

What are some of the benefits and risks of laser treatment for port-wine stains associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome?

Pulsed dye laser (PDL) remains the treatment of choice for the majority of children with a port-wine stain (PWS).[1] Laser treatment of port-wine stains may produce good cosmetic results, with a low incidence of adverse skin changes and other side effects.[2] A major benefit of laser treatment for a PWS is that it can help to minimize psychological problems associated with the social consequences of having a PWS. It has been shown that large facial port-wine stains are associated with an increase in mood and social problems in children older than 10 years of age.[1]Most experts agree that there is little risk associated with the use of PDL in a child with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), provided that anticonvulsant therapy is maintained and that adequate care is taken. The level of pain associated with laser treatment varies. Management of anesthesia should be carefully planned to minimize the potential for secondary effects.[1] Few children with SWS achieve complete clearance of their PWS with laser treatment; PDL does have limitations when large areas or dermatomal patterns are involved.[1][2]
Last updated: 3/14/2012

References
  1. Léauté-Labréze C, Boralevi F, Pedespan JM, Meymat Y, Taïeb A. Pulsed dye laser for Sturge-Weber syndrome. Arch Dis Child. November 2002; 87(5):434-435. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1763097/pdf/v087p00434.pdf. Accessed 3/13/2012.
  2. Hennedige AA, Quaba AA, Al-Nakib K. Sturge-Weber syndrome and dermatomal facial port-wine stains: incidence, association with glaucoma, and pulsed tunable dye laser treatment effectiveness. Plast Reconstr Surg. April 2008; 121(4):1173-1180.


GARD Video Tutorial

  • Finding Treatment Information - A video developed by GARD Information Specialists that explains how you can find information about treatment for a rare disease.

    Finding Treatment Information

Management Guidelines

  • Project OrphanAnesthesia is a project whose aim is to create peer-reviewed, readily accessible guidelines for patients with rare diseases and for the anesthesiologists caring for them. The project is a collaborative effort of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Orphanet, the European Society of Pediatric Anesthesia, anesthetists and rare disease experts with the aim to contribute to patient safety.

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Sturge-Weber syndrome. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • SWS
  • Sturge Weber syndrome
  • Encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis
  • Fourth phacomatosis
  • Meningeal capillary angiomatosis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.