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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Tracheobronchomalacia


Other Names for this Disease
  • TBM
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Overview

Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is a rare condition that occurs when the walls of the airway (specifically the trachea and bronchi) are weak. This can cause the airway to become narrow or collapse.[1] There are two forms of TBM: a congenital form (called primary TBM) that typically develops during infancy or early childhood and an acquired form (called secondary TBM) that is usually seen in adults.[2] Some affected people may initially have no signs or symptoms. However, the condition is typically progressive (becomes worse overtime) and most people will eventually develop characteristic features such as shortness of breath, cough, sputum retention (inability to clear mucus from the respiratory tract), and wheezing or stridor with breathing.[1][3] Most cases of primary TBM are caused by genetic conditions that weaken the walls of the airway, while the secondary form often occurs incidentally due to trauma, chronic inflammation and/or prolonged compression of the airways.[2][1] Treatment is generally only required in those who have signs and symptoms of the condition and may include stenting, surgical correction, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and tracheostomy.[1][4][5]
Last updated: 3/6/2015

References

  1. Ernst A, Carden K, Gangadharan SP. Tracheomalacia and tracheobronchomalacia in adults. In: Basow, DS. UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate; 2013;
  2. Christopher M Oermann, MD. Congenital anomalies of the intrathoracic airways and tracheoesophageal fistula. UpToDate. April 2014; Accessed 3/5/2015.
  3. Carden KA, Boiselle PM, Waltz DA, and Ernst A. . Tracheomalacia and Tracheobronchomalacia in Children and Adults: An In-Depth Review. Chest. 2005; 127(3):984-1005. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15764786. Accessed 9/12/2013.
  4. Ridge CA, O'donnell CR, Lee EY, Majid A, Boiselle PM. Tracheobronchomalacia: current concepts and controversies. Journal of Thoracic Imaging. 2011; 26:278-289. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22009081. Accessed 11/20/2012.
  5. Choo EM, Seaman JC, Musani AI.. Tracheomalacia/Tracheobronchomalacia and hyperdynamic airway collapse. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. February 2013; 33(1):23-34.
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Basic Information

  • Cedars-Sinai┬áhas an information page on Tracheobronchomalacia. Please click the link to access this resource.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Tracheobronchomalacia. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • TBM
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.