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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Whipple disease


Other Names for this Disease
  • Intestinal lipodystrophy
  • Intestinal lipophagic granulomatosis
  • Secondary Non-tropical Sprue
  • Tropheryma whippelii infection
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Symptoms

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What are the signs and symptoms of Whipple disease?

The gastrointestinal symptoms of Whipple disease include diarrhea, intestinal bleeding, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue, and weakness.[1][2] Arthritis and fever often occur several years before intestinal symptoms develop.[2] Patients may also experience neurological symptoms, including abnormalities of eye and facial muscle movements, confusion, seizures, ataxia, memory loss, and vision impairment.[1]

Last updated: 8/1/2012

The Human Phenotype Ontology provides the following list of signs and symptoms for Whipple disease. If the information is available, the table below includes how often the symptom is seen in people with this condition. You can use the MedlinePlus Medical Dictionary to look up the definitions for these medical terms.

Signs and Symptoms Approximate number of patients (when available)
Abdominal pain 90%
Abnormality of temperature regulation 90%
Anorexia 90%
Arthralgia 90%
Arthritis 90%
Decreased body weight 90%
Developmental regression 90%
Involuntary movements 90%
Malabsorption 90%
Mediastinal lymphadenopathy 90%
Abnormality of the pleura 50%
Hepatomegaly 50%
Hypotension 50%
Inflammatory abnormality of the eye 50%
Myalgia 50%
Sleep disturbance 50%
Splenomegaly 50%
Abnormal pyramidal signs 7.5%
Abnormality of the myocardium 7.5%
Abnormality of the pericardium 7.5%
Anemia 7.5%
Chest pain 7.5%
Cranial nerve paralysis 7.5%
Edema of the lower limbs 7.5%
Encephalitis 7.5%
Erectile abnormalities 7.5%
Galactorrhea 7.5%
Gastrointestinal hemorrhage 7.5%
Generalized hyperpigmentation 7.5%
Hydrocephalus 7.5%
Hyponatremia 7.5%
Hypothyroidism 7.5%
Incoordination 7.5%
Increased intracranial pressure 7.5%
Insulin resistance 7.5%
Muscle weakness 7.5%
Myositis 7.5%
Peripheral neuropathy 7.5%
Proptosis 7.5%
Respiratory insufficiency 7.5%
Seizures 7.5%

Last updated: 7/1/2016

The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) has collected information on how often a sign or symptom occurs in a condition. Much of this information comes from Orphanet, a European rare disease database. The frequency of a sign or symptom is usually listed as a rough estimate of the percentage of patients who have that feature.

The frequency may also be listed as a fraction. The first number of the fraction is how many people had the symptom, and the second number is the total number of people who were examined in one study. For example, a frequency of 25/25 means that in a study of 25 people all patients were found to have that symptom. Because these frequencies are based on a specific study, the fractions may be different if another group of patients are examined.

Sometimes, no information on frequency is available. In these cases, the sign or symptom may be rare or common.


References
  1. NINDS Whipple's Disease Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). March 22, 2011; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/whipples/whipples.htm. Accessed 12/8/2015.
  2. Whipple Disease. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). August 2014; http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/whipple-disease/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed 12/8/2015.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Intestinal lipodystrophy
  • Intestinal lipophagic granulomatosis
  • Secondary Non-tropical Sprue
  • Tropheryma whippelii infection
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.