Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Transient global amnesia


Other Names for this Disease
  • TGA
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

Newline Maker

What treatment is available for transient global amnesia (TGA)?

There is no specific treatment for transient global amnesia (TGA).[1] Fortunately, this condition resolves on its own, typically within hours of onset.[10544] Most people with TGA do not experience repeat episodes.[1][2]

People with repeat episodes of TGA should document the circumstances triggering the event. For some, it may be possible to prevent TGA by avoiding triggers. However, for many this is not possible. Possible triggers of TGA, include:[3][2]

Sudden immersion in cold or hot water
Strenuous physical activity
Sexual intercourse
Medical procedures, such as angiography or endoscopy
Mild head trauma
Acute emotional distress (e.g., from bad news, conflict or being overworked)
Exposure to high altitudes

Much of what we know about treatment of recurrent TGA comes from single case reports. These reports emphasize the need to rule out all other possible causes of recurrent TGA type episodes, such as transient epileptic amnesia, vascular disease, heart conditions, and adverse drug events, as this will affect treatment.[4][5][6][7]

The cause of transient global amnesia is not known, but migraines seem to be associated in many cases. We found a single report of metoprolol use for treatment of recurrent TGA in a man with a history of migraine.[3] Further study is needed to assess the efficacy of this treatment.
Last updated: 2/3/2016

References
  1. Sucholeiki R. Transient Global Amnesia. Medscape Reference. September 25, 2012; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1160964-overview#showall. Accessed 8/12/2014.
  2. Transient global amnesia. MayoClinic. July 18, 2014; http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/transient-global-amnesia/basics/causes/con-20032746. Accessed 2/3/2016.
  3. Berlit P. Successful prophylaxis of recurrent transient global amnesia with metoprolol. Neurology. 2000 Dec 26; 55(12):1937-8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed11134409. Accessed 2/3/2016.
  4. Tsai MY1, Tsai MH, Yang SC, Tseng YL, Chuang YC. Transient global amnesia-like episode due to mistaken intake of zolpidem: drug safety concern in the elderly. J Patient Saf. 2009 Mar; 5(1):32-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed19920437. Accessed 2/3/2016.
  5. Grande LA, Loeser JD, Samii A. Recurrent transient global amnesia with intrathecal baclofen. Anesth Analg. 2008 Apr; 106(4):1284-7, table of contents. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed18349207. Accessed 2/3/2016.
  6. Vyhnálek M1, Bojar M, Jerabek J, Hort J. Long lasting recurrent familiar transient global amnesia after betablocker treatment withdrawal: case report. Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2008 Feb; 29(1):44-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed18283253. Accessed 2/3/2016.
  7. Taylor RA1, Wu GF, Hurst RW, Kasner SE, Cucchiara BL. Transient global amnesia heralding basilar artery thrombosis. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2005 Dec; 108(1):60-2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. Accessed 2/3/2016.
  8. Shuping JR, Rollinson RD, Toole JF. Transient global amnesia. Ann Neurol. 1980 Mar; 7(3):281-85. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7425561. Accessed 8/12/2014.
  9. Agosti C, Akkawi NM, Borroni B, Padovani A. Recurrency in transient global amnesia: a retrospective study. Eur J Neurol. 2006 Sep; 13(9):986-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16930365. Accessed 8/12/2014.


GARD Video Tutorial

  • Finding Treatment Information - A video developed by GARD Information Specialists that explains how you can find information about treatment for a rare disease.

    Finding Treatment Information
Other Names for this Disease
  • TGA
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.