Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Glomus vagale tumor


Other Names for this Disease
  • Vagal paraganglioma
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Glomus vagale tumor is a type of paraganglioma, which is a tumor that develops in the paraganglia (a group of cells that are found near nerve cell bunches called ganglia). Glomus vagale tumors, specifically, grow in the paraganglia located near the vagus nerve, an important cranial nerve which serves many functions including empowering the vocal cords and the muscles of swallowing. In most cases, the tumors are benign, although rare cancerous cases have been reported. Signs and symptoms vary based on the size and location of the tumor but may include a neck mass, tinnitus (ringing or buzzing in the ears), difficulty swallowing, hoarseness, pain, cough, and/or cranial nerve paralysis. Some tumors may not be associated with any concerning features and are diagnosed by chance during imaging studies performed to investigate other conditions.[1][2] In many cases, the underlying cause of glomus vagale tumors is poorly understood. Approximately 40-50% of affected people report a family history of the condition.[3][1] Glomus vagale tumors can be associated with inherited syndromes caused by genetic changes (mutations) in succinate dehydrogenase subunits (i.e. SDHB, SDHD, SDHA, SDHAF2, SDHC) or the MAX gene.[4][1] Treatment usually includes surgery.[1][2]
Last updated: 4/25/2016

References

  1. Salman Kirmani, MBBS and William F Young, MD, MSc. Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndromes. GeneReviews. November 2014; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1548/.
  2. Righi S, Boffano P, Malvè L, Pateras D, Chiodo D, Boson M. Malignant vagal paraganglioma. J Craniofac Surg. September 2014; 25(5):e460-461.
  3. Zanoletti E, Mazzoni A. Vagal paraganglioma. Skull Base. August 2006; 16(3):161-167.
  4. Jennings AW, Preskitt JT, Vallera RD. Extraadrenal pheochromocytoma and vagal paraganglioma. Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). April 2012; 25(2):152-154.
GARD Video Tutorials
GARD Video Tutorials
Learn how to find information on treatment, research, specialists, and more.
Contact GARD
Contact GARD
Contact a GARD Information Specialist with your questions about this condition.

Basic Information

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Glomus vagale tumor. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Vagal paraganglioma
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.