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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Dystonia 10


Other Names for this Disease
  • Dystonia, familial paroxysmal
  • DYT10
  • EKD1
  • Familial paroxysmal dystonia
  • Familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia
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Overview

Dystonia 10 involves episodes of irregular jerking or shaking movements that are induced by sudden motion, such as standing up quickly or being startled.[1] Cold, hyperventilation, and mental tension have also been reported to trigger attacks in some cases.[2] The exact type of abnormal movement varies among affected individuals but may include prolonged muscle contractions, writhing motions, or fast, "dance-like" motions. One or both sides of the body may be affected. The episodes can sometimes be preceded by a crawling or tingling sensation in the affected body part and do not involve a loss of consciousness.[1][2] Individuals with dystonia 10 usually begin to show signs and symptoms of the disorder during childhood or adolescence. Episodes typically last less than 5 minutes, though they may last up to several hours. The frequency of episodes ranges from one per month to 100 per day. In most cases, the episodes occur less often with age.[1][2]
Last updated: 5/27/2015

References

  1. Familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. Genetics Home Reference. January, 2014; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/familial-paroxysmal-kinesigenic-dyskinesia. Accessed 5/27/2015.
  2. Spacey, Sian and Adams, Paul. Familial Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia. GeneReviews. June 27, 2013; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1460/. Accessed 5/27/2015.
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In Depth Information

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
    Orphanet
    Orphanet
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Dystonia 10. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Dystonia, familial paroxysmal
  • DYT10
  • EKD1
  • Familial paroxysmal dystonia
  • Familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.