Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia


Other Names for this Disease
  • Childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia
  • Childhood ALL
  • Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow, and the most common type of cancer in children. In children with this condition, too many stem cells made by the bone marrow become lymphoblasts, B lymphocytes, or T lymphocytes. These cells do not function normally and have trouble fighting off infections. Signs and symptoms may include fever; easy bruising or bleeding; bone or joint pain; painless lumps in the neck, underarm, stomach, or groin; weakness; fatigue; and/or loss of appetite. Treatment depends on several factors and may include combination chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and/or stem cell transplant.[1]
Last updated: 4/20/2015

References

  1. General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. National Cancer Institute. April 13, 2015; http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/childALL/Patient/page1.
GARD Video Tutorials
GARD Video Tutorials
Learn how to find information on treatment, research, specialists, and more.
Your Questions Answered
Your Questions Answered
View questions about this condition answered by GARD Information Specialists. You can also submit a new question.

Basic Information

  • Cancer.net provides oncologist-approved cancer information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has information about Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • The Mayo Clinic Web site provides further information on Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manual provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 
  • The National Cancer Institute provides the most current information on cancer for patients, health professionals, and the general public.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia
  • Childhood ALL
  • Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.