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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Congenital anosmia


Other Names for this Disease
  • ANIC
  • Isolated congenital anosmia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

How common is congenital anosmia?  Is there a cure or any treatment?


Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How common is congenital anosmia?

Studies suggest that approximately 1 in 10,000 people are affected by congenital anosmia. This includes people affected by isolated congenital anosmia (no additional symptoms) and those with congenital anosmia caused by a specific genetic disorder (such as Kallmann syndrome or congenital insensitivity to pain).[1]
Last updated: 6/9/2015

How might congenital anosmia be treated?

Unfortunately, there is currently no known cure or treatment for congenital anosmia.[2]
Last updated: 6/9/2015

References
  • Moya-Plana A, Villanueva C, Laccourreye O, Bonfils P, de Roux N. PROKR2 and PROK2 mutations cause isolated congenital anosmia without gonadotropic deficiency. Eur J Endocrinol. December 2012; 168(1):31-37.
  • Donald Leopold, MD. Disorders of Taste and Smell. Medscape Reference. April 2014; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/861242-overview#aw2aab6b5.
Other Names for this Disease
  • ANIC
  • Isolated congenital anosmia
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.