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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Retroperitoneal fibrosis


Other Names for this Disease
  • Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis
  • Ormond's disease
  • IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis
  • Ormond disease
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Symptoms

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What are the symptoms of retroperitoneal fibrosis?

Retroperitoneal fibrosis is characterized by inflammation and excessive scar tissue that develops in the back of the abdominal cavity. It can occur at any age, but appears most often between the ages of 40 and 60.[1][2] Men are twice as likely to develop the condition as women.[1]

Early symptoms of retroperitoneal fibrosis may include:[1][2]
  • Dull pain in the abdomen, back, or side that increases with time
  • Decreased circulation in the legs leading to pain, swelling, and discoloration
  • Impaired blood flow to the intestines leading to death (necrosis) of intestinal tissue, severe pain, and excessive bleeding (Hemorrhage)
  • Swelling of the scrotum in men

Late symptoms of retroperitoneal fibrosis may include:[1][2]

  • Decreased urine output
  • Total lack of urine (anuria)
  • Nausea, vomiting, weight loss, itching, anemia, and changes in thinking caused by kidney failure and the resulting build-up of toxic chemicals in the blood.
Last updated: 6/20/2016

References
  1. Sobol J. Retroperitoneal fibrosis. MedlinePlus. June 29, 2015; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000463.htm.
  2. Retroperitoneal fibrosis. Genetics Home Reference (GHR). July 2013; https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/retroperitoneal-fibrosis.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis
  • Ormond's disease
  • IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis
  • Ormond disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.