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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Giant cell arteritis


Other Names for this Disease
  • Arteritis cranialis
  • Arteritis temporalis
  • Cranial arteritis
  • GCA
  • Horton disease
Related Diseases
  • Secondary glomerular disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

Newline Maker

How might giant cell arteritis be treated?

Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is typically treated with high doses of corticosteroids. Corticosteroids should be started promptly (perhaps even before the diagnosis is confirmed with a biopsy). If not treated promptly, the condition carries a small risk of blindness. The symptoms of GCA usually quickly disappear with treatment, but high doses of corticosteroids are typically maintained for 1 month. Once symptoms are gone and the sed rate is normal, there is much less risk of blindness and the corticosteroid dose may be gradually reduced.[1] Other medications that suppress the immune system are sometimes also needed.[2]
Last updated: 8/24/2015

References
  1. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis. NIAMS. April, 2015; http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Polymyalgia/default.asp.
  2. Temporal arteritis. MedlinePlus. February 6, 2013; https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000448.htm.


GARD Video Tutorial

  • Finding Treatment Information - A video developed by GARD Information Specialists that explains how you can find information about treatment for a rare disease.

    Finding Treatment Information

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Giant cell arteritis. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Arteritis cranialis
  • Arteritis temporalis
  • Cranial arteritis
  • GCA
  • Horton disease
Related Diseases
  • Secondary glomerular disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.